Generation Labels: Limiting or Limitless?

On Oct. 21, I posed this question on Twitter:

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 7.42.24 PM

 

I’ve been thinking a lot about the labels that are placed on generations. I don’t hear much about the tags on Generation Y or Generation X, and when I did, it wasn’t hammered home like the Millennial label is now. I accept the Millennial tag, but I often wonder whether it really is a badge of honor or a label that is unnecessary. Many in the millennial generation, however, embrace the tag. So, I left it to the Twitterverse to see what they felt. I received some really great answers.


Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 8.00.46 PM

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 8.01.33 PM

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 8.01.11 PM

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 8.00.28 PM


Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 8.13.28 PM

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 8.11.11 PM

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 8.12.06 PM

 

You’ve heard some of the thoughts from Twitter. Now, what do you REALLY think about generational labels. Are they a hinderance to your success? Do they make you feel more confident? Let me know in the comments!

Five Things I Learned at PRSSANC

Another year and another Public Relations Student Society of America National Conference has come and gone. This was my second year presenting and I can tell you that I had just as much fun as I did in Philly last year.

The National Committee did an outstanding job of giving PRSSA Chapters and members all the opportunities to hear and learn from some outstanding people, like Rebecca Timms of the Philadelphia 76ers and Powell Tate president Pam Jenkins. In other words, there was no reason why you couldn’t leave with some great ideas for your chapter and your career.

As much as the conference is for students, I always come away learning a ton. As pros, we should never stop learning or take the thought process of, “what can students teach me?” Last year, I was able to take things I learned in Philly and put them to use in my business. What did I learn this year?

PRSSA gift1. Make adjustments- Even the best laid plans can be thrown for a loop. While I have to stay on my toes daily, I realized that instead of just keeping my presentation the way it was, I made tweaks about an hour before my talk. I learned something very valuable after talking to Utah Valley University’s award-winning PRSSA chapter. That is…

2. Never pass up a chance to network- For the second straight year, I sat with UVU PRSSA to talk about career, life, and how to approach a job interview. Talking to these impressive future pros reminded me why I love speaking and teaching. The opportunity to pass along the wisdom you’ve learned over the years, can be very helpful. And you never do know when a former student can assist you in your career. Seeing friends from University of Delaware, Illinois State, Temple University, as well as Chris Bonelli and Adam Piccin, reminded me that social conversations can turn into real life ones.

3. Embrace Your Moment – take the opportunity to share your ideas, thoughts with those around you. I relished hearing so many great ideas from the future pros gathered in D.C. Following many members on Twitter, I saw each share knowledge from the sessions they were attending. This was their moment to share what they were learning. I love that!

4. Ask Questions – Whether you are in a large group or in a one-on-one situation, never turn down the opportunity to ask questions and get answers. During my session on “Understanding What the Media Want,” I welcomed questions in the middle and the end. I expect to have people question what I’ve talked about. Why? Because I want to make sure I’m giving you the answers you are looking for about media pitching. Don’t just settle for what you think may be a good answers. Ask questions to get answers you need, especially in our industry.

5. Don’t Forget Where You Came From – I’m a proud alum of Temple University. When I graduated back in 1997, I dove right into my career and lost touch with being an Owl. I feel blessed to have been able to reconnect with my alma mater in the last number of years, thanks to Temple’s outstanding PRSSA chapter. Now, at every opportunity, I try to meet with these great Owls and help them when they need it. They make me proud to be a Temple alum, and I’ll never forget where I came from… A Cherry and White Wonderland!

Let me leave you with one last thought. Remember, it’s never too late to have a life and it’s never too late to change one. Go with confidence in your career… And in life!

What did you learn in D.C. this year? Let me know in the comments!

The JourneyCast Podcast, Ep. 10- Heather Whaling

JourneyCast Podcast with Heather Whaling

In this edition of The JourneyCast Podcast, we chat with Geben Communication president Heather Whaling. One of the most-trusted social influencers because of the hard work and dedication she -and her team- put in, Heather can be found speaking at conferences, being a thought leader through her blog, and setting the standard for what it means to be a true pro.

Heather discusses how she founded Geben, her work with the Columbus Marathon, being a new mom, and her love of the New York Yankees.

Heather can be found at prTini on Twitter and her blog. You can also follow Geben on the web and on Instagram.

Check out the latest JourneyCast Podcast episode!

Quick Hit: The Players Tribune… brilliant or sportswriter’s nightmare?

Derek Jeter’s blue Jumpman cleats haven’t even be cleaned off and he’s got the next phase of his life lined up. Much like his preparation for a baseball season, Jeter was ready for retirement and what lies in front of him. Earlier this week, the now former Yankee captain rolled out “The Players Tribune,” a site where athletes can directly connect with fans, unfiltered, and beyond 140 characters.

Jeter has already recruited Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl champion quarterback Russell Wilson as a senior editor. Wilson’s first post was heartfelt and honest. However, the site hasn’t been met with the same aura that Jeter carried during his sure-to-be Hall of Fame career.

After being lauded for his humbleness, work ethic, and respect for the game, Jeter is now being criticized by the same peoplethe-players-tribune for lauded him over his playing career. Why? Some sportswriters are cranky because they feel their jobs are being done for them. Really? Last I checked you can still interview these players before and after games, practices, and sometimes at public appearances.

There will always be a need for sportswriters. However, some of them were the same ones that complained about blogging a while back. Now, they are using for story supplements, first-hand reporting, and live blogging. You will not see papers laying off sportswriters because Derek Jeter has started a website.

At the end of the day, we, as sports fans, would love to learn more about our favorite players. Do I need to know about their personal lives? Not really, unless they’ve been bad (ahem, Ray Rice). I do look forward to learning more about how they’ll make an impact while playing or after their career.

Besides, I’d rather hear what Derek Jeter has to say over ESPN’s Keith Olbermann any day.

The JourneyCast Podcast: Jessica Lawlor

The JourneyCast Podcast is back and I’m thrilled to welcome my friend and fellow Temple University graduate, Jessica Lawlor. It’s no surprise that Jessica has become one of the more respected pros in our industry because of her drive, honesty, and work ethic.

If that’s not enough, she’s also the driving force behind the “Get Gutsy” movement. On this edition, we’ll talk about that, as well as how she’s been able to have success so early in her career. Enjoy!

To listen to the podcast, click this link.

The NFL’s Ray Rice Problem

Sept. 8-UPDATE: Ray Rice had his contract terminated by the Ravens and was suspended indefinitely by the NFL. The NFL released the news on Twitter, however the commissioner still has not commented, which continues to speak volumes. What is written below still stands: The NFL still has a problem.

By now, you have most likely heard about the infamous tape of Baltimore Ravens’ running back Ray Rice hitting his then-fiance. It was an absolutely disgusting scene and horrendous thing to do to someone you apparently care about. The National Football League, after viewing the tape, suspended Rice for two games, which came under intense criticism from fans and activists alike. Then, on Sept. 8, TMZ Sports released another, more graphic video which showed how brutal the beating Rice put on the woman who is now his wife.

The NFL created a public relations issue by only giving Rice a two-game ban for this assault. It now has a bigger issue because it appears the league had seen the more brutal video, but denied it initially. The problem is three-fold for the league, the Ravens, and Rice.

  1. The NFL handed down a light suspension to someone who knocked a woman out.
  2. The Ravens and their owner stood in support of Rice at a May press conference.
  3. Ray Rice’s first “apology” was not very heartfelt, saying “I apologize for the situation my wife and I were in.” Hitting Ray-Rice-Court.finalyour now-wife isn’t a situation, it’s an attack. The second wasn’t much better.

Rice is not the first athlete to hit a woman and he won’t be the last, sadly. But, in this day of social media and outlets looking deeper into news, videos like the one mentioned in the first paragraph will be more prevalent. Look how quickly the Jay Z/Solange Knowles video spread like wildfire.

The NFL opened its season on Sept. 4 with the defending Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks defeating the Green Bay Packers and then had a Sunday stacked with games. Many of them were really exciting. The league was hoping it would have the focus on the two Monday Night Football games, one featuring the New York Giants and the Detroit Lions. Those games will not be the focus. The focus is going to be on the more brutal video of Rice and what the league hasn’t done.

If the NFL wants to repair their image as one that looks lightly on domestic violence, they need to act now and suspend Rice for the season. They were tough on Ben Roethlisberger after he was accused of sexually assaulting a Georgia woman in 2010. Those charges were eventually not filed and he was suspended, ultimately, for four games.

Here’s what Commissioner Roger Goodell wrote to the Steelers’ QB after Roethlisberger was not charged:

“I recognize that the allegations in Georgia were disputed and that they did not result in criminal charges being filed against you. My decision today is not based on a finding that you violated Georgia law, or on a conclusion that differs from that of the local prosecutor. That said, you are held to a higher standard as an NFL player, and there is nothing about your conduct in Milledgeville that can remotely be described as admirable, responsible, or consistent with either the values of the league or the expectations of our fans.”

“You are held to a higher standard as an NFL player…” The Commissioner should go back and read those words again, because Ray Rice wasn’t held to a higher standard. The NFL and its leadership are faced with fans in an uproar over a lenient suspension. The next step could be sponsors pulling their money and even NFL players criticizing the league.

The NFL needs to act, for morality’s sake, and for their image.

 

Hustle Series: Darren Meenan and The 7 Line

You’ve all heard a story that intimates that a successful business that once started in “the basement of their home.” In the case of Darren Meenan, this isn’t a stretch. It’s fact. What started with Darren, a huge New York Mets fan, wearing a simple t-shirt he made that stated “I Survived” in 2009, ended up becoming the wildly successful, “The 7 Line.”

Meenan didn’t just settle on the fact a number of people asked about that one shirt. He sensed an opportunity and created his hustle. It began with equipment he bought on eBay and he created a few shirts in his parent’s basement. Since Mets fans (myself included) haven’t had too much to cheer about since 2006, Darren used these t-shirts to echo fans sentiment. One design said, “I Was Born into This Mess.” What Mets fan doesn’t feel that way sometimes? As 2009 turned into 2010, his hustle and entrepreneurial spirit began to pay off.

Photo Courtesy- ESPN.com

Photo Courtesy- ESPN.com

By wearing newer designs to Citi Field, the word began to spread about The 7 Line and Darren’s quality of work. It also didn’t hurt that he worked hard to spread the word, as well. Darren held signs with his website around the ballpark, some of which showed up on TV. More shirts, more exposure equals needing more space. So, Darren moved into a warehouse not too far from the ballpark.

While Darren’s story sounds like it happened overnight, it didn’t. He needed to work hard to conceptualize, print, and distribute everything with little help. His hustle has been featured on, among others, CNN Money and in the New York Times. Oh, and a little show called “30 Rock” featured Darren’s shirts, by request from the producers.

Darren has even been able to get the support from Mets’ players. A few years back, he traveled to spring training a gave a bunch to hand out in the clubhouse. Now, that’s hustle (and smart marketing, too). Mets players loved them and can be seen wearing the shirts before and after games.

Despite the Mets struggles, you’ll never hear a negative word from Darren. While fans may be frustrated, his hustle has helped create a new faction of fans. He thought it would be a great idea for Mets diehards to sit together, cheer on and support the team. “The 7 Line Army” was born. That one game spawned into the army not just going to games at Citi Field, but Wrigley Field in Chicago, Marlins Park in Miami, and AT&T Park in San Francisco to name a few.

Darren’s ability to bring fans together with his infectious attitude and excitement is a testament to dedication, hard work, and a never-ending hustle. See, Darren loves what he does because he works hard at it. He doesn’t cut corners. No one who hustles the right way does that. The Mets even noticed and The 7 Line now has a kiosk at Citi Field and is a licensed Major League Baseball brand.

What’s next? Darren has mentioned in interviews and on Twitter that he wants to open a bar one day next to Citi Field. If his hustle with The 7 Line is any indication, the bar will be a huge hit.

Depression, Suicide, and Me: Why I’m Talking

We all deal with things differently in life. Some of us can adjust and let things slide off like teflon; others take things and absorb them. It may be pressure, it may be feelings of doubt. Either way, it’s an inner pain that some do not let others know about, until it is too late.

Last week, the multi-talented Robin Williams took his own life. The reports were that he was battling depression and had been at a low point. Some called him a coward for committing suicide. You are wrong. Unless you’ve been on the edge, you don’t understand.

I posted this on Facebook on Aug. 12:

I’ve heard way too many people say that Robin Williams’ suspected suicide was a choice. It was. Because he may not have felt there was another way out. Do we truly know what he felt inside? All we saw was the imitations, the comedy, the fine acting. We did not know him after the lights went off. I find it hard to hear people say Robin Williams was a coward. Until you battle depression and reach the point where you want to kill yourself, please don’t tell me it’s cowardly. You don’t understand

I understood what Mr. Williams may have gone through because I’m still dealing with it. And that is depression. It is something I’ll deal with the rest of my life.

I had my own attempt at suicide when I was in college. I hit an extremely low point and I didn’t think it was very much worth it to live any longer. I wrote a note, downed some pills, drank a ton of alcohol. My hope was that the mixture would keep me from waking up again. But I did… thankfully. I thought I beat it, but three years ago, my depression returned.

Suicidal thoughts entered my mind. This time, though, I reached out for help. It was the best thing I have ever done. My AFSP-Logo-blockfamily doctor told me that it took a lot for me to admit that I needed that help. It was the first step in dealing with depression. That is why I’ve decided to lend a voice to those that have attempted or thought about suicide.

On Sept. 13, I will join hundreds of others in Buffalo, N.Y. for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s “Out of the Darkness” Walk. My team is called “Assemble for Strength” and the goal is to raise $1,000. If you feel empowered to support this cause, we would love to have you walk as part of our team. Want to give a dollar or more? Your efforts will assist AFSP’s vital research and education programs to prevent suicide and save lives. If what we do can support others around the country who have had the same thoughts as I did, we will go a long way to helping them down a better path.

You may see someone’s cheery personality and think they could never be dealing with depression. A person could be a dynamic speaker or a great mind in their industry. There’s no way they’d try to take their own life.

We never truly know what someone is going through, until we hear the news that they’ve committed suicide.

Please do not take this blog post as an attempt to capitalize on Robin Williams’ passing. It is an attempt to shine the spotlight of the grave nature of depression. I have a normal life with a great family. However, just because things seem normal does not mean that I don’t have days where I feel weak.

I sought help for my issues. It is my hope that if someone facing the same things reads this, they will reach out for help.

If you need help, there are many professionals in your town or city. Your healthcare provider can also give you the name(s) of someone who you can talk to one-on-one.

Thanks for listening.

Develop Your Hustle

“Nobody’s hustle is like anyone else’s” – Robert Downey, Jr.

I’ve been very open about how much of a fan I am of Robert Downey, Jr. He can act, sing, and he’s pretty good with a crowd. He’s also someone I derive inspiration from.

A few months back, I watched Downey on “Off Camera with Sam Jones.” It was a great look at how the Academy Award Nominee prepares for a role and how he views his impact on the world. Downey said something during the show that really hit home for me.

I think the greatest gift anybody can give anyone is the opportunity to develop your hustle. Sam, you didn’t
wind up with these great pictures on the wall and documentaries in the can because it was all handed to you. You have to develop that, and nobody’s hustle is like anybody else’s you know?

Think about that for a moment. You can’t fit your career goals, ambitions, and dreams into someone else’s box. 20140731-075807-28687361.jpgSo, while you may look to people for inspiration, your trip in this life will not mirror what they have done. Nothing is ever handed to you.

In 2010, I landed hard after getting let go from my job. But, I didn’t expect any handouts and wanted to work for everything. That is absolutely what you need to do, as well. Focus on your hustle… Make your hustle like no one else’s.

Over the coming weeks, I am going to focus on people who have developed their hustle. These will be folks that haven’t been given a handout; they’ve put blood, sweat, and tears into their careers.

I’m excited to feature these hard-working and great folks.

Don’t Play the Social Media Blame Game

Do a Google search on blaming social media and you’ll find over 5.6 million results. They range from social media being blamed for your bad mood to the 2011 London Riots being blamed on social nets. Social media is an easy punching bag because it’s still relatively “new” in society.

Social networks have taken the world by storm. First, it was a fad, then it was emergent and, finally, mainstream. Many people and organizations are on board with using social. While social is widely hailed as helping to transform the way we communicate, it’s become somewhat of a target or crutch when someone needs to place blame.

The latest “blame social media” incident was during the July 16 MLB All-Star Game in Minnesota. St. Louis Cardinals’ pitcher Adam Wainwright clearly grooved a fastball to retiring New York Yankees All-Star shortstop Derek Jeter in the first inning. Wainwright admitted it in a separate interview and was flamed on Twitter. He then backtracked in a dugout interview with Fox Sports’ Erin Andrews.

“Don’t you love social media…,” Andrews was saying tongue in cheek to Wainwright. He replied, “No, I don’t love social media.”

While this isn’t the most egregious violation of blaming social media, it is an example of the lengths people will go to place blame on social media for their own mistakes. Wainwright blaming social for his own error is akin to me blaming my kids You-cant-handle-the-truthfor not making dinner when I said I would in the first place.

Social media has become the punching bag for those that don’t really understand how powerful social is today. In this day and age, you need to fully grasp that your words and actions are magnified by social. Something that use to be a benign comment can be overblown very quickly. It’s not all social media’s fault; be responsible for what YOU do and say. Here’s how.

  • Don’t use social as a crutch- “I didn’t mean to post that,” “If I didn’t have a Twitter account, I wouldn’t do things like this,” or “Social media didn’t get my sarcasm,” are crutches that you need to throw away. They are excuses. You and you alone have the power to control your actions and virtual words. Period.
  • Understand what social can do for you- Social media is responsible for something of the biggest news events becoming bigger. Remember U.S. Airways Flight 1549? What about the raid on Osama Bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound that netted the Al Qaeda leader? These are examples of how social has changed news reporting, gathering and dissemination. It’s also become the place where brands make major announcements. With great power, comes great responsibility. Social media is a great responsibility.
  • Know your role- The more you understand how social works, the better off you will be when using it. If I post something and someone takes it the wrong way, that’s on me. I didn’t explain it well enough in 140 characters, or clearly in a Facebook post. Just because you don’t have a blue stamped check mark next to your name on Twitter or have a million followers on Facebook and Instagram, does not mean you aren’t being listened to closely. Your role in social media is a big one, whether you believe it or not. Appreciate what social is and what it has become.

Facebook is ten years old, Twitter is only eight years old. That’s still very young. However, social media has come a long way in that time. You need to understand that before you go placing blame on a social network for your words. Be better with social and you’ll appreciate the benefits.

Let me know your thoughts in the comments below.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,383 other followers